Enlarge / Walter Huang’s Model X in a tow yard days after his fatal crash. (credit: NTSB)
On March 23, 2018, a glitch in Tesla’s Autopilot technology contributed to the death of Walter Huang in Mountain View, California. As Huang’s Model X approached a left exit on US Highway 101, the software apparently got the lane lines mixed up. The car steered to the left, putting itself in the space between the diverging lanes. Seconds later, it crashed into a concrete lane divider at 70 miles per hour. Huang was taken to the hospital but died soon afterward.
Last week, the National Transportation Safety Board released dozens of new documents that provide a detailed understanding of the circumstances of Huang’s death. The documents confirm a claim by Walter Huang’s family that he had experienced this particular glitch, in this particular spot, multiple times prior to his fatal crash. He complained to family and friends about the issue. However, the NTSB was not able to confirm another key claim: that Huang reported the issue to Tesla.

Forensic data also suggests one reason Huang might not have been paying attention to the road in the final seconds before his death: he was in the habit of playing a game called Three Kingdoms in his car while driving to work. Logs from his Apple-provided iPhone showed that he used the app during his morning commute every day the week of his fatal Friday crash. However, those logs don’t provide enough information to say if he was interacting with the game in the final seconds before his death.Read 21 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Source: Car news one

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *